Author Topic: Fox advice  (Read 114 times)

Offline j76clev2

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 27
Fox advice
« on: January 22, 2019, 11:02:47 AM »
The other night went out around 9pm before the so called winter storm moved in. Second stand walking off the road I hit eyes about 50 yards away on a feild edge it immediately disappeared so I set up. 3 mins into my second sound 2 sets of eyes sitting on an old overgrown log road across a creek about 100 yards away. Hung up not moving . I shut the call off sat in silence for about 2 mins which is when the strange vocalization started first close then farther then close then farther. ( only after a google search did I realize this was fox barking) I resumed prey distress on and off for the next 20 mins during the off periods the vocalizations commenced. To me it sounded like the first second of a pheasant cackle. Long story longer those eyes never came anywhere close enough to identify positively (if I had know what fox barks sounded like I could have possibly shot but never any oppurtunity out of the brush) ...almost like they established a safe distance and were still barking. Is there something I could have done differently to entice movement or was this stand shot from the get go? Does anyone here feel comfortable taking shots at animals in thick cover?

Josh

Offline Misterjake23

  • PPHA Members
  • PPHA Forum GURU
  • *****
  • Posts: 2,270
Re: Fox advice
« Reply #1 on: January 28, 2019, 11:59:16 PM »
I agree with you for not taking the shot.  Never shoot unless you can 100% identify your target.  This time of year gets tough calling.  Many of the critters left have already been called before and even shot at, therefore they are very weary.  You’ll also find if you hunt a lot of fields fox will often hang up 200 yards out and just sit down and watch, listen and smell.  Many times never come any closer.  All you can do is throw some different sounds out there and hope one of them triggers them to respond.  I like using Foxpro’s Bay Bee cottontail as a coaxer.  Sometimes a simple bulb squeaker works for me.  Vole squeaks is another good one.  Play softly.   If they bark,  usually it’s because they don’t like something and it’s a warning to other fox.  Sorta like when a stranger comes in your yard and your dog barks at them.  Coyotes will do the same thing,  from my experience,  when a K9 barks it’s game over.....  they won.   Try using Red fox Rally if you have a foxpro and bark back.  It may get it to move enough for an identification and even a shot.   Most likely with two sets of eyes this time of the year is a mating pair running together.

Good luck,  I hope this helps
« Last Edit: January 29, 2019, 12:05:10 AM by Misterjake23 »
Jake
York, PA
Bee's O'Brien Field Staff
If you heard my shot, Feel lucky...I wasn't aiming at you!

Offline j76clev2

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 27
Re: Fox advice
« Reply #2 on: January 30, 2019, 08:44:23 AM »
Thanks for the advice. Definately helps!

Offline Brushwolf

  • PPHA officers.
  • PPHA Forum GURU
  • *****
  • Posts: 879
Re: Fox advice
« Reply #3 on: January 31, 2019, 07:31:13 PM »
Pretty good advice there Misterjake23!!